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The New York Times Takes on Conflicts of Interest in K-12, Again

Natasha Singer—this time with colleague Danielle Ivory—have released another in the New York Times’ series ‘Education Disrupted.’ Like other stories in the series, it focuses on issues of conflicts of interest in education and educational technology. This issue is a cancer on the sector, enabled by and made worse by the lack of any serious interest in self-policing or self-regulation. 

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In the News: On Conflicts of Interest in EdTech

The increasingly common practice of public school teachers affiliating with edtech companies deserves greater scrutiny. On social media many educators proudly tout their corporate affiliations as proof of their digital learning expertise, much like NASCAR drivers wear corporate patches on their uniforms. I don’t know where we should draw the line on conflict of interest policies here, but I am convinced it is past due time to revisit those policies for a digital age.

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Five EdTech Story Ideas for Education Reporters

This week, education reporters from across the nation are gathering at the 2017 Education Writers Association National Seminar (#EWA17) in Washington, DC. Among the topics they will focus on is technology in education (AKA “digital learning”). To that end, I suggest five story ideas for reporters interested in the topic, as well as an admonition to go easy on the edtech jargon.

Pretty please.

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The Next Social Contract for Public Education Needs New Terms of Service

It is time to reboot the social contract for public education in a digital age. At the same time, we must remain clear-eyed and recognize the ways in which technology also introduces new issues and potential threats. What we need are terms of service that provide every student and their family assurances that their interests remain at the fore.

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