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Study: One-to-One Laptop Programs Improve Student Learning

Newly published, peer-reviewed research finds that one-to-one laptop programs improve student academic achievement in K-12 classrooms. Given the top line finding, I suspect the study will garner much attention and – at the same time – be subject to much spin. Here is my summary of the study, with accompanying analysis of what we can reasonably conclude from the findings.

A Real and Present Student Data Privacy Threat

According to an alarming new study, school districts are routinely sharing individual student data about discipline with colleges as part of the admissions process, and colleges are in turn using that data to deny admissions to students. With no empirical evidence to support the practice, a lack of written policy, and demonstrable harm to students, this practice must cease.

Why Are We Biased Against Games for Learning?

Games for learning advocates take note. A new study reveals that parents of young children are more likely to say technology and media has a positive effect on young children’s creativity and basic educational skills. However, the one medium that runs counter to this trend is video games, for which a majority of parents hold negative views in terms of its impact on learning. I can offer no compelling armchair hypothesis for why parents are so negative about the educational impact of games. It seems as if there is some cultural bias at play that is anti-gaming – and I believe undeservedly so.